The Worth of Water

The engine room at Papplewick Pumping Station near Nottingham. Spent a wonderful couple of hours there photographing the magnificent beam engines and boiler house at this preserved piece of industrial heritage. These buildings were not built as public buildings and for decades few saw the design and detail that went into their construction. Papplewick, in particular, has a wonderful symmetry to its design, a symmetry that repeats over the three levels of the engine house and even into the more utilitarian boiler house with its six symmetrically arranged coal boilers.

When the well is dry, we know the worth of water – Benjamin Franklin

The pure fun of making photographs

As I child one of my early memories was of our dad taking photographs on what I later learned was a 1940s vintage Zeiss Ikon folding camera – I have it to this day. He’d been in the airforce and I recall there were a few board-mounted black and white prints of places as diverse as Paris and the Shetland Islands that he’d made himself in his own darkroom. Years later, as a graduate student, I’d set up my own darkroom in a cupboard of a flat I rented using his enlarger.

It clearly sparked an interest and as a teenager I was given a Russian Zenit-EM 35mm with it’s 58mm f/2 Helios lens. I probably had that camera for longer than just about any other since and it served me well as a student geologist. Later, I splurged on a second camera a Soviet Lubitel 2 120 roll film twin lens reflex. While there were undoubtedly better cameras around in the 1980s, they were well beyond my budget and I can’t help but feel that the shear fun I had using these manual cameras instilled my long term interest in photography.

So, no surprise that I recently spent a thoroughly enjoyable few hours wandering around the iconic location of Bodiam Castle in Sussex on the south coast of England. Wind direction and light conspired to make this view the one that worked best rather than the more usual image that shows the castle completely isolated by it’s moat but it was the pure fun of making it that will be my lasting memory of the day.

Click here to see more of my landscape photography.

Much Meddling in the Marsh

Romney Marsh, Kent, 2019Much Meddling in the Marsh may be a rather corny pun on the Kenneth Horne radio comedy show Much-Binding-in-the-Marsh broadcast over half a century ago on the BBC. However, it rather aptly describes the various attempts I’ve made over the years to capture an image of St. Thomas à Becket church on Romney Marsh. Seems a wet and rainy October Monday finally gave me a chance to photograph this iconic location and capture some of its characteristic isolation, minus the usual summer weekend tourists.

The House with Two Front Doors

Quirky, ancient and a modern day trip hazard pretty much sums up the uneven cobbled Mermaid Street in Rye in East Sussex that is populated with timber framed Tudor and earlier houses. On a wet and rainy Sunday, it was pretty quiet making the photography easier even if the light was far from ideal.

The House with Two Front Doors